Call for Managing Editor

The Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness is looking for a new editor for their journal Anthropology of Consciousness.

Anthropology of Consciousness Open Access

CALL FOR MANAGING EDITOR

Anthropology of Consciousness

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: December 15, 2014

The Executive Board of the Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness is now inviting applications for Managing Editor of its peer-reviewed journal, Anthropology of Consciousness. Interested applicants should submit a CV, a written statement specifically addressing the qualification criteria listed below and her/his vision for how the journal might evolve. Please send all materials to Beth Savage, SAC Secretary/Treasurer at savagebetha@gmail.comFinal selection will follow an interview, preferably before or at the 2015 SAC Spring Meeting in Oregon.  The three-year term begins August 1, 2015.

Qualifications for Anthropology of Consciousness Managing Editor:

  • Demonstrated interest in and knowledge of SAC’s areas of research and scholarship.

  • Experience and knowledge in publishing, editing, and journal administration.

  • Excellent written and oral communication skills.

  • Higher degree in anthropology or closely related field.

  • Proven record of refereed publications.

  • Ability to adapt…

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Mobile Health in Context

Mobile Health in Context: How Information is Woven Into Our Lives  

@SusannahFox @PewResearch

Susannah Fox from Pew Review Research put together an excellent presentation of the latest health and digital technology related statistics.  The slides are concise, accessible, and thought provoking.  Can we put cell phones to use improve health and health information seeking strategies?   

I came across this presentation of data at exactly the right time thanks to Carol Torgan.  The information will be incredibly insightful to my future dissertation research and will go along way in demonstrating the significance of my proposed research.

DANG Panel Accepted

The BRIDGING DIGITAL AND PHYSICAL PUBLICS: DIGITAL Anthropologists’ CURRENT ENGAGEMENTS WITH 21st CENTURY PUBLICS panel has been accepted!!  It is being reviewed by the Society of Visual Anthropology. The panel with include the following papers:

Anastasiya Travina (Texas State University-San Marcos)                    500,000 Tweets and Posts During The First Two Hours Of The London Olympics: Does IT Mean The Olympics Is A Universally Lauded Event?

Meghan M Ferriter (Smithsonian Institution Archives)                           “It Boils Down to Respect”: Defining the Values of a Fandom Through Conflict Online

Sarah Elaine Dillard Mitchell (Indiana University, Department of Anthropology)                                                                                       TIFF’s Immediate and Mediated Public: Social Media, Public Relations, and the Economies of Talk At the Toronto International Film Festival

Michael P. Oman-Reagan (Hunter College of the City University of New York)                           Occupying Cyberspace: Indonesian Cyberactivism and Occupy Wall Street

Laura C Jarvis (Southern Methodist University)                           Facebook Or Face-to-Face: Studying Youth In and Out of the Field

Sarah S Ono (Department of Veteran Affairs)                                         By the Time We Get to the Station Will the Train Already Have Left?: Keeping Up With New Media in the Public Sector

Alissa Beth Kaplan Soto (Hunter College)                                    Women’s Autonomy Through Self-Insemination and Cyberspace

Congratulations and Thank You to all the panel participants and DANG!

Check Us Out on the 112th Annual AAA Conference!

 

About Me

My name is Sydney Yeager. I am cultural anthropologist and an ABD PhD candidate at SMU (Southern Methodist University) PhD program.  My primary research interested are focused in digital anthropology and medical anthropology.  In particular, I plan to conduct my PhD dissertation research on emerging grieving practices in digital spaces, with particular focus on Facebook, and their impact on participants’ lives and social well-being.  Additionally, my medical interests are in the areas of neuroanthropology, consciousness, biocultural medical anthropology, and social well-being.  I am interested in the anthropological study of friendship, community, and religion as well.  More broadly speaking, my research interests include folk healing, spirituality, identity, consciousness, communitias, the processes of acculturation, education, community, cultural change, and the impact of our increasingly digitalized social lives.

I am  on the Executive Board of the Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness.  I serve as SAC’s first Media & Social Media Chair beginning in November.  Check out SAC’s blog here and our website here.  SAC has a nice Twitter and Facebook following as well.

I have also recently taken over the responsibility of convener for the AAA’s new Digital Anthropology Interest Group, fondly known as DANG.  I occasionally write for their blog and DANG’s G+, Facebook accounts.

Contact Me:

slyeager@smu.edu

@slyphi

G +

Facebook

 

Call for Papers: Digital Anthropologists’ Current Engagements with 21st Century Publics

Check out the Digital Anthropology Call for Papers: Call for Papers: Digital Anthropologists’ Current Engagements with 21st Century Publics.

 

 

DANG Call for Papers

DANG Call for Papers

Deadline April 10th (To Meet April 15th AAA Deadline for Sessions)

Email Abstracts to sydneyyeager@gmail.com

Digital Anthropologists’ Current Engagements with 21st Century Publics: #Digital Publics, #Ethics, #Methods, #Insights

The future publics, which anthropologists of the 21st Century will engage with, occupy a social space in which the digital and the physical overlap.  Therefore, ethnographic study of these future publics merits consideration of the corresponding and relevant digital social spheres.

In light of this year’s conference theme “Future Publics, Current Engagements,” this panel intends to demonstrate how digital anthropologists are currently engaging with and researching “digital publics.”   This panel will highlight the current engagements of anthropologists conducting field research which bridges the overlap between digital publics and physical public spaces.  This panel strives to foster a discussion of the methods, ethics, and insights that Digital Anthropology can offer for “engaging with future publics” as digital technology continues to become a part of the everyday lives of the people anthropologists study around the world.  Major questions include: How do anthropologists collect and analyze data while doing digital field work?   What are the ethical issues facing anthropologists who rely on visual data and texts collected in the digital publics of the internet (social networking sites, forums, websites, etc)?  How does digital anthropology intersect with the physical as people increasingly act in physical space in response to the digital realm?  What kind of “future publics” are being constructed through today’s “current engagements” by users and anthropologists in the cyberspatial plazas of the internet (social networking sites, etc.)?

Furthermore, as digital technology continues to become a part of the everyday lives of the people anthropologists study, what insights can Digital Anthropology offer the broader discipline for “engaging with future publics”?  A discussion of ethnographic examples and evidence of the interactions between digital/online and physical life is pertinent to both the future of anthropological engagements with the public and to current concerns about digital studies in anthropology.

Building off goals established in the first organizational meeting of the newly formed Digital Anthropology interest group (DANG), this panel will address critical questions relating to the methods and ethics of digital fieldwork.  Presenters will demonstrate the applicability of insights, drawing from their current engagements with digital publics to advance the discipline of anthropology and prepare anthropologist for engagement with future publics.

 
Digital Anthropologists’ Current Engagements with 21st Century Publics: #Digital Publics, #Ethics, #Methods, #Insights

DANG Call for Papers

Deadline April 10th (To Meet April 15th AAA Deadline for Sessions)

We are seeking presenters with papers which will address questions of ethics in digital anthropology.   We want to include papers which demonstrate innovative methods solutions to issues particular to digital fieldwork.  Papers with findings and insights applicable to digital anthropology and the future of anthropology as a whole are strongly encouraged.  We are particularly interested in having papers that discuss the overlap and interactions between digital/online and the physical.   We invite presenters to submit paper abstracts pertinent to the themes outlined above; however, we do not wish to limit abstracts to strictly these themes.

We invite abstracts of 250 words to be submitted by April 10, 2013 to sydneyyeager@gmail.com  Look for email confirmation.

 

Performance Enhancing Drugs – College Edition

Passing with Pills: Redefining Performance in the Pharmaceuticalized University”  is a very thoughtful and thought provoking ethnographic look in the mirror.  Tazin Karim of Michigan State University did an excellent job applying a critical, medical anthropological lens to academia and the pressures of the rite of passage in America referred to as college.  
When discussing the exportation/globalization of mental illness and Western pharmaceuticals, undergrads in both my Intro to Anthropology discussion sections admitted to knowing a ‘friends’ who used Academic Performance enhancing drugs …  I have to admit my own caffeine dependence could fall in the same category.  American culture in general gives preference to substances which promote productivity and the University is no exception.  A few of my students discussed being prescribed Ritalin and Adderall long before they entered a college campus.  One girl described for us how ease it had been for her best friend to get a prescription, which she used primarily to write papers and make it through finals week.  

I think this is a very serious issue which is largely ignored because it gets the desired results and is socially linked to productivity and achievement.  For my part, some might argue that I am part of the problem, as a graduate student and teaching assistant who was aware of these thinly veiled “confessions.”   But I am 25 years old which makes me only a few years older than most of my students and this time four years ago I was the undergrad who had close friends doing the same thing.  However, it also raises an important ethical issue.  This was information I gained from a semester of building rapport with my students and a safe environment for discussion in my classroom.  In that moment, I saw my responsibility in guiding my students to think critically about the social and structural pressures that make the need for academic performance drugs and in interrogating the problematic dichotomy between legal prescription drugs and illegal drugs.  I pushed them to critically think about any substance they put in their body and I urged them to be accountable for researching these medicines, their purpose and their side effects.  In that classroom, I felt that was the extent of my ability to influence the matter.

But as a medical anthropologist, I think this is definitely an issue which merits further investigation and careful attention to potential solutions that address this “inconvenient truth.”  Karim’s narratives demonstrate the hidden reality on our campuses.  I hope to see more work along these lines in the future.